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Uniquely HK

Feature Story

Climb Every Mountain

With the arrival of autumn, the hills are alive with hikers drawn to the territory’s many trails, criss-crossing spectacular upland areas. CityLife highlights some of Hong Kong’s best hikes for a wonderful day out!

P art of the allure of Hong Kong is the juxtaposition of the city’s dense urban landscape of endless skyscrapers, crowded streets and thronging crowds and its verdant rural hinterland. Some 70 percent of the city is green, with much of it protected as country parks.

Hong Kong is tenaciously natural, its steep, rocky terrain a constant challenge for development. Over 130 peaks exceed 1,000 feet (315 metres) in height, with many close to the sheltered bays and sandy beaches along its rugged coastline. Together with magnificent Victoria Harbour , the mountains of Hong Kong are integral to the city's image. To walk among them promises panoramic views of hills, cityscape and the glimmering seas, a breezy escape for locals and visitors alike.
 
Hong Kong is blessed with an extensive network of well-maintained hiking trails that allow visitors convenient access to explore these upland areas as a day trip. This month, CityLife is delighted to showcase a selection of the city's most spectacular and picturesque hill scenery for your adventure. Fitness requirements vary, so consider yours, and go at your own pace.
 
Now then, lace up your hiking boots or sneakers, and join us on a fabulous day out!
 
Victoria Peak (The Peak)
 
Elevation  1,811 feet 英尺 / 552 metres 
Also known as Mount Austin, Hong Kong's most famous mountain is top of any visitor's list, and for good reason. The spectacular views of the city and beyond from the Peak are iconic. While there, take the Peak Circle Walk, which loops around Mount Austin. The 50-minute stroll reveals multiple panoramic vantage points of the city and shaded paths rich in sub-tropical flora. To reach the very summit of Mount Austin, take a further 20-minute walk up Mount Austin Road, past Victoria Peak Garden . You can also walk back down to the city, such as by Old Peak Road.
 
 
从中环乘15号巴士到山顶
 
Mount Parker
 
Elevation1,745 feet 英尺 / 532 metres
 
Hong Kong Island's second-tallest peak is also a favourite for day hikers and easy to reach, with gorgeous views along the way. Follow Mount Parker Road from Quarry Bay all the way to the top, in the lee of two dazzling radar installations. The 360-degree views are simply mesmerizing. On the way down, at Quarry Pass Pavilion several trails meet and you can either retrace your steps or stroll down to the picturesque Tai Tam Reservoirs to wrap a perfect day out.
 
Tai Koo MTR Station Exit B and a short walk
 
 
Jardine’sLookout and Mount Butler
 
Elevation J : 1,421 feet  / 433 metres 
M : 1,430 feet  / 436 metres 
 
These two hills separated by a steep valley are part of the Hong Kong Trail (Stage 5), a 50km-long path winding through Hong Kong Island and one of four major trails in the territory. Both hills offer spectacular views of the city, the Tai Tam reservoirs, and the south side of Hong Kong Island and beyond. Start from the Hong Kong Parkview development on Wong Nai Chung Gap Road and hike up to Jardine's Lookout. You descend steep steps past an old quarry before climbing back up Mount Butler. The views along the way are absolutely worth the effort. This hike also ends at Quarry Bay Pavilion, where you can either go on to the Tai Tam reservoirs or north to Quarry Bay via Mount Parker Road.
 
Take Bus 6 from Central to Stanley and get off at Wong Nai Chung Reservoir Park on Wong Nai Chung Gap Road. Walk up to Parkview.
 
 
VioletHill and The Twins
Elevation 
V : 1,430 feet  / 436 metres 
T  1,266 feet  / 386 metres 
Hong Kong Island's second-tallest peak is also a favourite for day hikers and easy to reach, with gorgeous views along the way. Follow Mount Parker Road from Quarry Bay all the way to the top, in the lee of two dazzling radar installations. The 360-degree views are simply mesmerizing. On the way down, at Quarry Pass Pavilion several trails meet and you can either retrace your steps or stroll down to the picturesque Tai Tam Reservoirs to wrap a perfect day out.
 
Same as left page; then after finishing The Twins, take any bus to Stanley along Stanley Gap Road.
 
Lion Rock
 
Looming over Kowloon Peninsula, craggy granite Lion Rock is one of the most recognizable skyline features in Hong Kong, thanks to its resemblance to a crouching lion. A climb to the lion's head at the top of the mountain delivers gorgeous views both of Kowloon and north to Shatin and the New Territories beyond. Located within the Lion Rock Country Park, the hike to the top is moderately difficult. You can approach from either Wong Tai Sin in Kowloon (around two hours) or from Tai Wai near Shatin on the other side . For an extended push, hike from Wong Tai Sin to the top via MacLehose Trail Stage 5, then come back down to Tai Wai, passing also-famous Amah Rock.
 
How to get there: Wong Tai Sin MTR Station Exit E and head up Shatin Pass Road, passing Fat Jong Temple and into the hills and the Country Park. Or avoid the initial steep walk by taking a taxi or Minibus 18M to Fat Jong Temple.
 
 
Tai Mo Shan (Elevation: 3140 feet or 957 metres): Hong Kong's highest peak surprisingly offers gentler slopes than its peers. Several approach options include a lengthy hike through beautiful waterfalls around Ng Tung Chai. We recommend a shorter route from the entrance to Tai Mo Shan Country Park at the Rotary Park, following the paved road all the way up to the Observatory Weather Radar Station, past the Visitor Centre and the Lookout. On a clear day, the panoramic views are simply spectacular and well worth the trek.
 
How to get there: Tsuen Wan MTR Station Exit A, take Bus 51 on Tai Ho Road North and get off at the Country Park stop.
 
 
 
 
Sai Wan Shan (Elevation: 1000 feet or 315 metres) MacLehose Trail Stage 2, Sai Kung Country Park East: Perhaps Hong Kong's most scenic trail, this route passes stunning volcanic rock formations, unspoilt white-sand beaches, hamlets and villages, and beautiful coastal scenery with photo spots galore. The trail starts at the East Dam of High Island Reservoir, a Hong Kong Geopark site, noted for its 140-million-year-old hexagonal volcanic columns. An easy walk over a small hill takes you to the pristine sandy beach of Long Ke, with its crystal-clear waters. The climb from Long Ke to Sai Wan Shan then offers a more vigorous workout that rewards you with splendid vistas of the rugged coast and the famous Ham Tin beaches, arguably Hong Kong's best and most unspoilt. After passing a couple of remote villages you'll climb back up towards the mountain pass where the ultra-steep Sharp Peak beckons. We suggest leaving that for another day and instead heading up to Shek Kong and on to Pak Tam Au , where Stage 2 ends. It’s a wonderful hike and you can cap your day with a sumptuous seafood dinner in Sai Kung Town.
 
 
How to get there: Take Minibus 101M from Hang Hau MTR Station to Sai Kung Town and then a taxi to East Dam or Bus 94 from Sai Kung Town to Pak Tam Chung and taxi to East Dam.
 
 
Sunset Peak
Elevation: 2851 feet or 869 metres
Together with Lantau Peak, Sunset Peak, Hong Kong's third-highest mountain, is much-loved by hikers eager to soak up amazing views of the island and the South China Sea or catch a spectacular sunrise or sunset. There are several approach options. We recommend you start from Mui Wo at the entrance to Lantau Country Park at the Nam Shan barbecue area. After an hour of arduous climbing along a shaded trail, the views open up and it's scenic all the way to the top, passing fantastic flora and scattered campsite buildings. The trail ends at Pak Kung Au on Tung Chung Road, where there are buses back to Tung Chung.
How to get there: Take the ferry from Central Pier Number 5 to Mui Wo and then either take a taxi or bus 3M to the Country Park entrance.
 
 
Lantau Peak
 
Located in western Lantau is Hong Kong's second-highest peak and another popular climb. Along the way you'll enjoy splendid vistas of Hong Kong International Airport, the Hong Kong–Zhuhai–Macau Bridge and the South China Sea, and perhaps a gorgeous sunset . The best route starts at Pak Tung Au and follows Lantau Trail Section 3. The ascent is occasionally steep but steady. On the way down you can stop by Ngong Ping, one of Hong Kong's favourite visitor destinations and home to the Big Buddha, among other attractions. From there the Ngong Ping 360 Cable Car descends to Tung Chung or you can follow the trail to Tei Tong Tsai and on to Tung Chung.
 
 
    

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